ekstra lett melk

English translation: Extra low fat milk

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Norwegian term or phrase:ekstra lett melk
English translation:Extra low fat milk
Entered by: Charles Ek

13:18 Mar 15, 2011
Norwegian to English translations [PRO]
Food & Drink
Norwegian term or phrase: ekstra lett melk
This is the product with 0.5 - 0.7 % fat content. Here in the U.S., we generally have skim milk (aka nonfat milk) with 0 - 0.5 % fat, then lowfat milk (once known as extra-light milk) at 1 - 1.5 %, then "2 % milk", and finally whole milk. I don't know of any product corresponding to the Norwegian one. Anyone know of an English language equivalent?
Charles Ek
United States
Local time: 01:31
Extra low fat milk
Explanation:
Well, low fat milk would be lettmelk. This is a Norwegian product, extra low fat milk. I don't think you could go wrong going with my expression. However, I do not know if the same product even exists in the US.
Selected response from:

Erik Wallace
Grading comment
Thanks. I think this is the right choice. It has some support on the Web as well.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +10.5-0.7% milk
Donna Stevens
3Low Fat Milk
Jande
3Extra low fat milk
Erik Wallace


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


46 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Extra low fat milk


Explanation:
Well, low fat milk would be lettmelk. This is a Norwegian product, extra low fat milk. I don't think you could go wrong going with my expression. However, I do not know if the same product even exists in the US.

Erik Wallace
Native speaker of: Native in NorwegianNorwegian, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks. I think this is the right choice. It has some support on the Web as well.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
0.5-0.7% milk


Explanation:
I haven't seen any equivalent sold in the shops in the UK or the US.
In the EU, there are three set categories of milk (whole milk, semi-skimmed milk and skimmed milk). Milk of any other fat content is allowed to be sold if the fat content is specified explicitly. So, unless you are translating a recipe using this type of milk (in which case I'd use 'skimmed milk'), it would be best to just use the phrase stipulating the fat content, since 'extra light milk' is a phrase that is often used by people to mean 1% milk.


    Reference: http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2010/12/23085837/2
    Reference: http://www.milk.co.uk/page.aspx?intPageID=43
Donna Stevens
Norway
Local time: 08:31
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  lingo_montreal: OK - and see my comments in discussion
11 hrs
  -> Thanks!
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16 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Low Fat Milk


Explanation:
There is in order of fat content:
Organic Milk (around 4% fat)
Whole Milk (around 3.25% fat)
Reduced Fat Milk (around 2% fat)
Low Fat Milk (around 0.5-2% fat)
Fat-free / Skimmed Milk (less than 0.5% fat)

These milks are also called (based on historical branding and colloquially):
Full Cream (around 3.25-4% fat)
Trim Milk (around 0.5-2% fat)
Skinny Milk (less than 0.5% fat)

http://www.parmalat.com.au/index.php?option=com_content&view...


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fat_content_of_milk

http://www.annecollins.com/calories/calories-milk.htm

http://www.medindia.net/patients/patientinfo/TypesofMilk_typ...

Jande
Australia
Local time: 18:31
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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